Curator’s Corner: Making a Donation to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum

 

Behind the scenes view of the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum Collection Facility

Behind the scenes view of the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum Collection Facility

Have you ever thought about donating heirlooms to a museum? Have you cleaned out your attic or a family member’s home and come across scrapbooks, photographs, uniforms, or other memorabilia you think a museum may be interested in? Museums are the gatekeepers of the past, the interpreters of history, and the conservators of historical artifacts.

The U.S. Navy Seabee Museum’s mission is to collect, preserve, and display historical material relating to the history of the Seabees and the Civil Engineer Corps. We cannot fulfill our mission without donations and no one wants to come to an empty museum. The artifacts and archives bring history to life.

Trench art jewelry fashioned out of Plexiglas from a downed Japanese aircraft donated to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum by a Seabee who was assigned to the 51st Naval Construction Battalion which operated near Saipan during WWII.

Trench art jewelry fashioned out of Plexiglas from a downed Japanese aircraft donated to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum by a Seabee who was assigned to the 51st Naval Construction Battalion which operated near Saipan during WWII.

Why donate your heirlooms to a museum?

There are many reasons to donate your heirlooms to a museum because they have a historic or regional significance, relate to a significant person or event, and offer resources for future researchers. Preservation is also another reason why people donate their heirlooms. Museums provide housing for artifacts through climate controlled storage facilities and safe environments away from sunlight damage, daily wear, and mold contamination for future generations to enjoy.

If the items you are considering donating are not your own, it is recommended that you discuss your intentions with all family members prior to donating your relative’s memorabilia to a museum. It is important that everyone is in agreement.

Finding the Right Museum

Once the decision has been made to donate items to a museum, the next step is finding the right institution for your objects. Museums have different missions and themes. Museum types vary including: history, natural history, science, or children’s museums. It is important to find a proper institution where your heirlooms will be safe and appreciated. Think locally for your heirloom’s new home and visit near-by museums to discuss donation potentials.

The U.S. Navy Seabee Museum is under the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC). This Command oversees 10 Navy museums around the country with the shared mission to collect, preserve, protect, and make available the artifacts, documents, and art that embody our naval history and heritage for future generations.

(For a complete list of the navy museums, please visit http://www.history.navy.mil/visit-our-museums.html )

At the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum, we consider all donations that relate directly to the U.S. Naval Construction Force and the Civil Engineer Corps. If you or your relative were a Seabee, CEC Officer, or were directly associated with them, we would be happy to consider your donation.

Letters written by a Seabee to his wife back home during WWII. These were donated to the Seabee Museum by a Seabee’s relatives.

Letters written by a Seabee to his wife back home during WWII. These were donated to the Seabee Museum by a Seabee’s relatives.

Proposing the Donation

Before contacting an institution about your potential donation you need to gather the item’s story, we call that provenance. In the museum world the word provenance refers to an object’s history, who owned the object, when and where, and any other information on the object. Objects alone may have historical value, but the stories that accompany the object bring them to life.

We need to know as much information on the Seabee or CEC officer. For instance, which battalion they served in. If you do not know the answer, the national archives have made it easier for you to request Military Service Records by visiting their website at http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/. We also capture oral histories, documentation proving the item’s authenticity, letters, journals, diaries, photographs, record of importation, manufacture, or sale, and legal documents like deed or wills.

Making Contact

Once you have chosen a museum, call to find out who handles the donations, most likely it would be a curator or registrar. At the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum, the curator is responsible for accepting new donations. I can be reached by telephone at 805-982-6191 or by e-mail at robyn.king1@navy.mil. We ask that you contact the museum before you drop off any donations. They will not be accepted as walk-in donations. I will ask you to describe the item, its history, and why you think it belongs in the museum. If it is of interest to the museum, I will then ask to see a photo of the object to see its condition.

Each donation is presented to the Museum Collection Committee who ultimately decides to accept the donation or not. The museum may take temporary custody of the item while it makes its decision. This process usually takes 3 months due to our current backlog. You will be notified if your object was selected to be included in our collection.

Accepted: Transferring Ownership

If the Seabee Museum accepts your donation, the paperwork is simple. You sign an official Deed of Gift form and your heirloom becomes property of the Department of the Navy. If your donated item has a copyright, this process will be further discussed with our archivists at that time.

What happens after the donation?

                After you have transferred ownership, the Director of NHHC at the Washington Navy Yard must accept your donation to the museum. This may take a few weeks to process. Once the Seabee Museum receives back all appropriate paperwork we will then accession (accept your donation into the Seabee Museum Collection), catalog (individually number each object), photograph, and prepare the object for exhibition or storage. Your name, as donor, will be linked to the donated items in the collection database. If the item is included in an exhibition, museum staff might have to do additional research on the object.

Fallen Soldier Battle Cross and eagle hand carved onto an antler as a dedication to the Seabees of NMCB 25 that passed away in 2006. This was donated to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum and currently on exhibit in the Hall of Heroes.

Fallen Soldier Battle Cross and eagle hand carved onto an antler as a dedication to the Seabees of NMCB 25 that passed away in 2006. This was donated to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum and currently on exhibit in the Hall of Heroes.

Is your donation guaranteed to go on exhibit?

The simple answer is no. It may never go on display. Only about 2% of a museum’s collection is on display in the museum at any given time. The majority of collections are in storage for preservation and to be studied by scholars and researchers.

Rejection

No matter how much your heirloom means to you, it may not be right for the museum. It might be declined because it is in poor condition, or it does not fit the Seabee Museum’s mission, falling outside the museum’s scope of collection or the museum already has similar items.

Every museum has storage and capacity issues. We cannot accept every donation and have collecting priorities. If our museum collection is unable to accept your donation, you may have the option to donate it to our education department for learning purposes.

If the Seabee Museum declines your donation, consider offering it elsewhere. Local maritime museums collect navy related artifacts; state archives collect diaries, letters, maps, photographs and some artifacts; and the NHHC has 9 other museums that may be interested in your donation.

Thank You to the Donors

                The donation process is a detailed process, mostly done behind the scenes at a museum. With your help and knowledge of your items, together we can work together to make the process as smooth as possible. By contacting the museum first, we can tell you right away if your donation is something we may be interested in acquiring and go from there. The entire processes from start to finish may take about 3 months. You will receive a thank you letter from our museum director showing our appreciation and gratitude.

Your donations help our museum fulfill its mission to collect, preserve, and display historical material relating to the history of the Seabees and the Civil Engineer Corps. Please consider donating to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum if you think you may have objects relating to the Seabees and the Civil Engineer Corps. I look forward to speaking with you over the phone to start the donation process!

150225-N-JU810-010Meet the Curator: Robyn King Robyn King earned her Bachelors in History and Anthropology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has experience working at State Museums, Historic Sites, the National Parks Service, and most recently the Navy. She’s an expert in collection management, and has worked closely with both natural and cultural collections. Robyn loves all museums and sharing her love of history. When’s she not working, she’s volunteering her time with the National Peace Corps Association, as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from West Africa.

Archivist’s Attic: The Song of the Seabees

Song of the Seabees001

Starting up a new arm of the military can always be a challenge. What logos to use, what drills to run, what kind of exercises, commands and personal do you need to get units up and running. All important questions. On the lighter side, but perhaps just as important to moral, community and spirit, are the mottos and songs used to excite and drive the new units into action.

The Seabees officially became part of the Navy during World War II. At this time the U.S. Navy had its own traditions including their own music and lyrics. Never quite satisfied with the all-embracing Navy song “Anchors Aweigh,” the Seabees came up their own rousing chant that they put to music and turned into “The Song of the Seabees.”

Seabee Song 5

Within a few months the bright and spirited song became a hit with glee clubs and radio orchestras, as well as with the Seabees themselves. Often times the song went by motto of the Seabees, “Can Do, Will Do.” Millions of copies were distributed and its popularity continued to grow. The song was even included in the popular magazine “Hit Parader” and was sung by many well-known stars including the very talented Judy Garland.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HC_wQQrZ3Xc

The song also became popular as a recruitment devise and was used in various advertisements encouraging men to join the new units. The opening words were often used at the start of an article before describing the various different jobs one could do while working as a Seabee.

Song of the Seabees004

The song remained popular long after World War II was won. In 1966 a contest was held to add another verse to the song. The Seabees got a lot of different entries but the winner was C.T. Green and his verse is now part of the official Seabee song.

We’re the Seabees of the Navy

The “Can-Do” men in green.

In war or peace you’ll find us,

Ready on the scene.

And no matter what the mission,

With our past we’ll keep tradition.

We’re the Seabees of the Navy,

Bees of the Seven Seas.

Though the song might have lost some popularity with the general public, it continues to be sung at various ceremonies and throughout the Seabee community.

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Meet the Archivist: Ingi House
Ingi House is originally from Kansas where she got her B.A. in history from K.U. and M.L.S. from E.S.U. After working for the Dole Institute of Politics she moved to the East Coast.  In D.C. she worked at the National Archives and Records Admiration and then at the Defense Acquisition University where she became a Certified Archivist. Her continued enjoyment of military history lead her to switching coasts and coming to work for the Seabee Museum where she is collection manager for the archives and records manager liaison