The Seabee Museum Pushing Forward ACB to UCT

As we move into fall, the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum staff reflects on the year—(what did you do over the summer?). Earlier this year we opened a new exhibit in the Changing Gallery: The Impossible Takes a Little Longer, Celebrating the Seabees 75 years through 75 objects. Then over the summer we finished a complete renovation of the Humanitarian exhibit with artifacts and a storyline describing the many different aspects and time periods in which Seabees have provided humanitarian assistance while traveling the globe. Moving forward, the museum staff recently renovated the Amphibious Construction Battalion (ACB), and Underwater Construction Team (UCT) exhibits.

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Humanitarian exhibit

During the simultaneous renovation of both exhibits: we elaborated on the ACB and UCT storylines, added new and enhanced exhibited artifacts with new cases, and relocated artifacts. Relocating most of the artifacts took one, maybe two staff members, though day- one of the overhaul included the staff pushing and pulling a 2,000-pound T-6 Pontoon from the WWII Atlantic Theater Gallery across the Grand Hall and placing it in the middle of the ACB exhibit. Moving the pontoon into the exhibit area enabled us to tell a more complete ACB story with text panels and a 12-foot long timeline detailing their history from WWII to the present, and the transformation of pontoons and lighterage.

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With a more complete story, we highlighted the scientific part of ACB beginnings and continued that into the Underwater Construction Teams’ story and their contribution to the Ocean Facilities Program and the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL). Within these stories, we showcase NEMO (Naval Experimental Manned Observatory), underwater construction tools, and the transition of diving masks and tools from WWII to the present.

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UCT exhibit

Present plans as we head into winter: the Morgan Wilbur OEF (Operation Enduring Freedom) Seabee art exhibit will be closing in 2-months during the first week of December and heading back to the East Coast. The Exhibit Team is preparing to move the Transition Years (1975-2001) exhibit to North Gallery and refresh the Civil Engineer Corps Gallery with new panels, artifacts, and interactive programming.

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Three of the paintings included in the Morgan Wilbur OEF exhibit.

 

What is a pontoon and what are they used for?

What percentage of the Earth is covered with water?

The oceans hold what percentage of the Earth’s water?

 

The “Large Slow Target”

Off the shore of Normandy, France during the D-Day invasion, June 1944 an enemy mine hit and sunk LST (Landing Ship Tank) 523. Known as the “Large Slow Target” by servicemen as LSTs traveled at 12 knots under a load of 2,100 tons its design fulfilled a critical need in WWII.

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Troops and equipment load aboard a Seabee Rhino ferry from LST at Normandy, June 1944.

During WWII, Allied forces needed an ocean-going ship capable of shore-to-shore delivery of vehicles, tanks, and cargo. With that goal in mind, the British began development of such a craft. In meeting with Americans November 1941, U.S. Navy’s Bureau of Ships (BuShips) agreed to design and build LSTs for Allied use. The LST vessel with its flat bottom, large ballast system, 14-foot wide ramp enabled Seabee Special battalions to drive tanks, vehicles, and unload construction equipment directly onto beaches or causeways. Normandy invasion forces needed an estimated 12,000 tons of daily supplies and 2,500 vehicles were needed for the first 90 days of combat operations.

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Seabees with the 1006th Naval Construction Battalion Detachment offloading equipment from LSTs on Utah Beach, June 1944. When high tide comes, the ships retreat from the beach.

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The LST-523 model made of balsa wood on display in the Atlantic Theater WWII gallery at the Seabee Museum in Port Hueneme, CA. Scale of model: 1 inch equals 6 feet (1:72).

By the war’s end, BuShips built more than 1,050 Landing Ship Tanks. However, only 26 LSTs succumbed to enemy action and a further 13 were lost to weather or accidents. A model of the sunk LST-523 at 1:72 scale and 56” long sits proudly on display in the Atlantic Theater WWII gallery at the Seabee Museum, in Port Hueneme, CA.

Today, a WWII Landing Ship Tank is still in service as a Long Island Sound ferry for passengers and vehicles.

 

Questions:

What role did the Seabees play in off loading the LSTs?

How does 12 knots compare to land speed?

When and where did D-Day take place?

Seabees in Somalia for Operation Restore Hope

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Map of Somalia in Africa.

In 1992, the United States sent military support to provide relief to the war-torn nation of Somalia. That December, the Seabees deployed as one of the units forming the United Nations’ coalition force in support of Operation Restore Hope. The main objective under Operation Restore Hope was to create a protected environment to conduct humanitarian operations in the southern half of Somalia and bring food and water to starving Somalians.

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Seabee and local people pumping water in Somalia during Operation Restore Hope

Seabees supported this effort through establishing and constructing base camps at humanitarian relief sites. To connect the camps, Seabees repaired and improved main supply routes by clearing debris from city streets including bridges. However, one of the largest projects was renovating and expanding the Baidoa airstrip. This project involved removing 300,000 square feet of asphalt surface, pulverizing and mixing it with cement, and then grading and compacting the mixture. More than 600,000 square feet of AM2 matting was also laid for aircraft turnarounds, parking aprons, and helipads. The airstrip enabled the coalition’s C-130 relief flights that brought food to local people.

Furthermore, Seabees provided humanitarian support by drilling and restoring water wells, and completing work on schools and orphanages. These daily humanitarian efforts nurtured connections with local people, their daily life, and art forms. Such is displayed through these Somali baskets, which Seabees brought home from their time in Africa during Operation Restore Hope. These baskets do exactly that, restore hope. Using their traditional artistry, local people gathered available grasses and wove these three baskets with lids. One of which is located in our 1990s gallery as part of “The History of the Seabees in 75 Objects,” temporary exhibit is open February 2018 through January 31, 2019.

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Somali Baskets crafted in Somalia and brought back to the United States in 1993. NMCB 40 and 30th NCR transferred the baskets to the U.S.N. Seabee Museum.