Curator’s Corner- Artifact Spotlight: SCW Pin Seabee Sculpture

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SCW Pin Seabee Sculpture, created by SW2 (SCW) Fontaine & SW1 (SCW) Ramirez, Keflavik, Iceland, 2005 (U.S. Navy Seabee Museum)

A new addition to the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum’s permanent collection is a steel metal sculpture known as the SCW Pin Seabee. This modern style Seabee insignia incorporates the Seabee Combat Warfare Specialist insignia (SCW) which is prominently displayed on the sculpture along with a battle dressed Seabee. The sculpture was welded and brought to life by Steelworker 2nd Class (SCW) Fontaine & Steelworker 1st Class (SCW) Ramirez for the last Seabee Ball at Naval Air Station Keflavik (NASKEF), Iceland in 2005.

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SCW Insignia displayed on the sculpture

NASKEF is a former U.S. Navy base at Keflavik International Airport close to the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik. Built during World War II by the U.S. Army as part of its mission to protect Iceland and to secure northern Atlantic air routes, it served to ferry personnel, equipment, and supplies to Europe. In 1942, one of the first Seabee units was sent there to help construct Meeks Field, a main ferrying and transport airfield used for flights between the US and the UK.

 

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Map of Iceland, courtesy of Google Maps

U.S. forces withdrew from Iceland in 1947, only to return in 1951 with NATO members under a formal defense agreement to operate NASKEF. The base acted as a platform for several operational capabilities throughout the Cold War and in the modern arena. Seabee Detachments (DET) were assigned to NASKEF’s Public Works Department until the base was disestablished on September 8, 2006 and its facilities were turned back over to Iceland.

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Close up of the half man/ half bee Seabee (U.S. Navy Seabee Museum)

Presumably, the SCW Pin Seabee was created to show Seabee pride. The Seabee is represented having the head, arms, and torso of a man (GI Joe® figure), and four additional arms and the body of a bee. The Seabee is holding a wrench, hammer, welding torch, handgun, gas mask, and a rifle in each of his hands to show his construction abilities and his military prowess. As Steelworkers, the creators of the sculpture added an arc welding power supply in the foreground to highlight their Seabee rate. This sculpture is an example of how a new generation of Seabees portray themselves compared to the Disney-style bee. The museum is continuing to gather further information regarding the provenance of this Sculpture and welcomes any new information.

Visit the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum and see how the Seabee insignia has evolved since its creation in 1942.

photo-of-robyn-for-curators-cornerMeet the Curator: Robyn King is pursuing her master’s degree in Museum Studies and Nonprofit Management through Johns Hopkins University. She earned her Bachelors in History and Anthropology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has experience working at state museums, historic sites, the National Park Service, and most recently the Navy. She is an expert in collection management, and has worked closely with both natural and cultural collections. Robyn loves all museums and sharing her love of history. When she is not working, she is volunteering her time with the National Peace Corps Association, as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from West Africa.

Curator’s Corner- Humanitarian Missions

 

 

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NMCB 3 Seabees deployed to Djibouti to work with Combined Joint Task Force- Horn of Africa

The U.S. Navy Seabees have a long history of providing humanitarian efforts around the world from Palau in the South Pacific to Afghanistan. Seabees are vital members of the Combined Joint Task Force- Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) and are deployed to build partner nation capacity in Eastern Africa and help prevent Islamic radicalization. Lt. Cmdr. Michael James of NMCB 74 said, “as Seabees, we normally are supporting other units and forces…here in HOA, we’re one of the primary means for CJTF-HOA to accomplish its mission by building schools, medical clinics and water wells … we aren’t just building something and leaving, we’re interacting with the people and working with them to help themselves make their life better.”

Senior Chief Equipment Operator (EOCS) Pamela Leith (nee Lee), donated the first collection to the museum representing the Seabees deployment with CJTF-HOA. EOCS Leith was deployed with NMCB 3 to Djibouti for humanitarian missions in 2009. While in Djibouti, EOCS Leith worked on a school rehabilitation project in the city of Ali Sabieh and a water well mission in Dikhil. By using the construction force’s building expertise, the Seabees are able to complete many small projects and spend more time interacting with the community.

On one such occasion, the hotel where the Seabees were staying in Ali Sabieh was constructing an additional building and EOCS Leith noticed the Djiboutian’s were doing everything by hand and hauling dirt in by buckets. She decided to help by using the Seabee’s front end loader to haul a few scoops in and build up their floor. This small gesture probably saved them several days of labor which only took her an hour.

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Seabees from NMCB 3 celebrating the end of Ramadan with Djibouti natives

 

The hotel staff was grateful for the Seabees’ contribution to their community and treated them like family for the duration of their stay. They invited the Seabees as their guests to a large feast after Ramadan which they all attended and even threw EOCS Leith a dinner party before she departed on her new mission. The staff appreciated everything she had done for them and gave her gifts of local tradition which included a dress, skirt, shawls, and a large knife with leather scabbard which are currently on display in the museum.

While EOCS Leith was building the water well in Dikhil, she was notified that the new hotel building in Ali Sabieh had added her name in large letters to a pillar as a sign of respect and gratitude. She went back to see the finished building and to greet the hotel staff. Leith said, “It was truly touching that they did that for me!”

Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Legg of NMCB 11, who NMCB 3 replaced said, “Actions often speak louder than words…as we work side-by-side with the Africans through our military-to-military programs or build new school facilities here in Djibouti, our efforts speak volumes to the fact the American people care, and we are here to help Africans find solutions to African problems.”

Come visit the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum and see EOCS Leith’s collection and other humanitarian mission stories.

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Meet the Curator: Robyn King is pursuing her master’s degree in Museum Studies and Nonprofit Management through Johns Hopkins University. She earned her Bachelors in History and Anthropology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has experience working at state museums, historic sites, the National Park Service, and most recently the Navy. She is an expert in collection management, and has worked closely with both natural and cultural collections. Robyn loves all museums and sharing her love of history. When she is not working, she is volunteering her time with the National Peace Corps Association, as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from West Africa.

 

 

 

 

Archivist’s Attic: Headquarters Construction Companies

October 31, 1941, like Halloween itself, war loomed on the forefront as the U.S. scrambled to get bases built in order to help out her allies. In order to prepare for the possibility of war the Bureau of Yards and Docks (BUDOCKS) decided to organize military units known as “Headquarters Construction Companies.”

Map of the Philippines that “Headquarters Construction Companies” worked on.

Map of the Philippines that “Headquarters Construction Companies” worked on.

Up until 1941 construction work done on U.S. bases was done by contracts utilizing civilian labor. Civilians that were not part of the military, had no military training, and would be caught like a deer in a headlight in combat situations. Furthermore, under military law, the contractor’s forces in their status as civilians could not offer resistance when the bases they were constructing were under attack, if they did, they would be considered guerillas and would have been liable to summary execution if captured.

Map of Puerto Rico, 18 March 1941.

Map of Puerto Rico, 18 March 1941.

The “Headquarters Construction Companies” were designed to give the military oversight on to base construction until another solution could be worked out. These units were composed largely of rated personnel that were utilized as administrative units by officers in charge of construction at advance bases in case war interrupted contract operations. One company was organized by the Bureau of Navigation and granted authority for the enlistment of its personnel in Class V-6 of the Naval Reserve. That company formed the nucleus of the First Naval Construction Detachment, the Bobcats, which became the first unit of the newly formed Seabees.

The Seabees officially came into being on December 28th, 1941, and the “Headquarters Construction Companies” became a part of history. While the companies were only used for a short time, they set up the organization and most importantly contributed the men that would become the Seabees. As we head into the early holiday season, remember that even the scariest of times can have a very merry ending.

150225-N-JU810-001Meet the Archivist: Ingi House
Ingi House is originally from Kansas where she got her B.A. in history from K.U. and M.L.S. from E.S.U. After working for the Dole Institute of Politics she moved to the East Coast.  In D.C. she worked at the National Archives and Records Admiration and then at the Defense Acquisition University where she became a Certified Archivist. Her continued enjoyment of military history lead her to switching coasts and coming to work for the Seabee Museum where she is collection manager for the archives and records manager liaison.