Curator’s Corner- Seabee Recruitment Caravan & Exhibit Truck

 

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Seabee Exhibit Truck (reproduction), used during the WWII Seabee nation-wide recruitment campaign (U.S. Navy Seabee Museum)

The U.S. Seabee Museum, with the help of the CEC/ Seabee Historical Foundation, has acquired a WWII reproduction of a Seabee Exhibit Truck which was used during the Seabee Nation-Wide Recruitment Campaign.  An original 1942 exhibit diorama from the museum’s collection is displayed in the truck.

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Recruitment Poster (U.S. Navy Seabee Museum

The recruiting campaign began in October 1942 and nation-wide tours launched in 1943 to spearhead the enlistment of 100,000 Seabees into the Naval Construction Battalion by the first of the year.  The Seabee recruitment caravans, also known as a “recruiting stations on wheels,” consisted of an exhibit truck and a recruitment cruiser. The caravans was accompanied by four enlisted men and two commissioned CEC officers who provided full information about enlisting with the Seabees. Men from ages 17 to 50 with construction experience were needed immediately to build bases on distant battlefronts.

 

“…one of the most interesting [exhibits] to have ever been produced by the navy department…The purpose of the display is to stimulate interest in enlistments in the Seabees, the construction battalion of the navy.”

                                                                                            -The Times Leader, August 1943

The exhibit truck’s diorama, depicted through the medium of miniature wax figures*, shows a complete landing operation carried out by the Seabees on Island “X” in the South Pacific. The dioramas showed Seabees clearing away tropical trees, building barracks, landing supplies and performing multiple other duties required of them in establishing island bases.

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Newspaper article announcing the arrival of the recruitment caravan, Middletown, OH Journal August 16, 1943

Prior to the Recruitment Caravan’s visit to each city, arrangements were made in advance to distribute special posters, have newspaper articles written, and to have announcements made by local radio stations of its arrival. Further publicity was made through local labor organizations and social clubs.

Upon arrival to visiting cities, the caravan was escorted into the city by a police escort and station wagon, accompanied by fanfare, music, and crowds. The vehicles usually “docked” in front of the county courthouse or city hall. In the evening the caravan would “anchor” at a local park where concerts were held before the showing of the Seabee motion picture “Builders for Battle” and “Sports of Sailormen”. The entire community was invited to see the movies free of charge and inspect the exhibit.

The Seabee Museum’s Exhibit Truck is modeled after one of the original trucks that toured the Midwest during the summer of 1943.  The recruitment caravan visited numerous cities in Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana during the two-month tour where an estimated 140,000 people viewed the exhibit diorama.

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Before displaying one of the original dioramas in the newly procured exhibit truck, the Naval History & Heritage Center (NHHC) Conservation Branch performed conservation treatment on the diorama with the goal to stabilize it and improve its aesthetic integrity for its upcoming exhibition.  The diorama was cleaned, distorted figures were stabilized, fallen or broken palm fronds were re-attached, and its background was fixed and painted.

Come visit the Seabee Exhibit Truck at the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum today and check out the newly conserved diorama.

*Miniature figures were made out of different materials including wax, putty, and paper mache

 

photo-of-robyn-for-curators-cornerMeet the Curator: Robyn King is pursuing her master’s degree in Museum Studies and Nonprofit Management through Johns Hopkins University. She earned her Bachelors in History and Anthropology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has experience working at state museums, historic sites, the National Park Service, and most recently the Navy. She is an expert in collection management, and has worked closely with both natural and cultural collections. Robyn loves all museums and sharing her love of history. When she is not working, she is volunteering her time with the National Peace Corps Association, as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from West Africa.

Curator’s Corner- Blue Star Mother Flag

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Courtesy of the War Manpower Commission

Blue Star Mother Flags, also known as Service Flags or Blue Star Flags, represent a symbol of love, pride, hope, and grave concern for families who have members serving in the military during any period of war the United States is engaged in. The tradition of displaying the indoor flag began during World War I. The flag was originally designed and patented by Army Captain Robert L. Queisser of the 5th Ohio Infantry who had two sons serving on the front line. The flag would hang in the front window of the home with a blue star (or multiple blue stars) representing the number of their children or family members serving in a war.

During World War II, the practice of displaying the Blue Star Flag became much more widespread. On February 1, 1942 the first meeting of the Blue Star Mothers of America, Inc. was attended by 300 women in Flint, Michigan. The organization was founded as a Veteran Service Organization and was part of a movement to provide care packages to military members serving overseas and to assist families who encountered hardships as a result of their son or husband serving in the war. Quickly, chapters formed around the nation, and the Blue Star Flags of WWI reappeared in the windows of American homes once again. There were over 300,000 Seabee families in World War II who could display the Blue Star Mother’s official banner.

The U.S. Navy Seabee Museum has many Blue Star Mother artifacts within its collection including two which are currently on exhibit in the WWII Home Front display. The three blue stars on the flag represented the Baker sons fighting in WWII, and was proudly displayed by their mother. The pin was worn by the mother of WWII Seabee Chief Robert D. Jacobs. It is unique in that it combines the Seabee insignia, Navy anchors, and the Blue Star Flag.

Come visit the U.S. Navy Seabee Museum on Tuesday April 4, 2017 from 2-4pm to see the Blue Star Mother artifacts and other rarely seen artifacts from the collection at the Curator’s Corner event.

 

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Meet the Curator: Robyn King is pursuing her master’s degree in Museum Studies and Nonprofit Management through Johns Hopkins University. She earned her Bachelors in History and Anthropology from the State University of New York at Oneonta. She has experience working at state museums, historic sites, the National Park Service, and most recently the Navy. She is an expert in collection management, and has worked closely with both natural and cultural collections. Robyn loves all museums and sharing her love of history. When she is not working, she is volunteering her time with the National Peace Corps Association, as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer from West Africa.